NHS Ill Health Retirement with fibro

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NHS Ill Health Retirement with fibro

Postby paulfoel » Mon Jul 06, 2015 4:01 pm

Following on a bit from my other thread.

Has anyone working for NHS successfully got this?
Notice form says permanently unable to perform job until retirement age. Who knows how your fibro is going to be so how did you get around that?
Anyone ever claimed and then few years later gone back to work? How does this work?
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Re: NHS Ill Health Retirement with fibro

Postby paulfoel » Mon Jul 06, 2015 4:17 pm

Been reading one of the guideline documents and it does say you have to be permanently unable to do your current job up until normal retirement age.

Then later it does go on about abatement and what happens if you return to nhs employment. Surely this is contradictory - if you were definitely permanently unable then you're never going to go back to work? :-)

Although, surely if this is the case it would work well for Fibro. i.e At the moment she is not going to go back to work but who knows in 5 years time......
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Re: NHS Ill Health Retirement with fibro

Postby TheHud » Mon Jul 06, 2015 5:36 pm

It's about going back to that particular job and whatever happens it's very unlikely that after 5 years of fibro eating away at the muscles and skeletal structure (due to pain, fatigue, spasms/cramps and stiffness) that anyone would be able to return to an active nursing role.

Fibro is for life, not just for Christmas :(

As for what should be said, use the NHS own description and potential fibro prognosis. Perhaps you could send the link to the Occy health person so they can appraise themselves of the hows and now's.

http://www.nhs.uk/Conditions/Fibromyalg ... tment.aspx
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Re: NHS Ill Health Retirement with fibro

Postby UnderSiege » Mon Jul 06, 2015 8:50 pm

Hi guys.

TheHud, you said:

"It's about going back to that particular job and whatever happens it's very unlikely that after 5 years of fibro eating away at the muscles and skeletal structure (due to pain, fatigue, spasms/cramps and stiffness) that anyone would be able to return to an active nursing role."

From my point of view as somebody who considers their fibro as relatively mild compared to some (can still mow lawns/use a strimmer some days and doesn't ever need aid to walk just yet but it's a close thing) it only need take a few months for someone's hard earned fitness levels to become as dust in the wind let alone 5 whole years...

After having what I now know as the symptoms of fibro for years, I had a massive flare/crash in September last year which has never really stopped with only a very few days here and there being 'good ones' as opposed to over half the days in a month being good before that. Six months on from the start of that mega flare/crash I finally got to see an expert, a physiotherapist, as part of my pain management (along with yet another useless set of sacro-iliac joint and trigger point injections in my back which for the umpteenth time barely worked)

I was supposed to see the physio for a course set over weeks, the first session was a talky one, the second actually started physio work at which she stopped, declared I was 'the stiffest person she'd dealt with in over 3 years' (remember, after only 6 months of reduced activity) and moved me onto group sessions which I've failed at because It's been really difficult to even get there...

I missed enough of the first course to be dismissed and put onto the next one and of those 3 sessions (so far) I've been on time for one, late for the second and missed todays due to pain, restricted mobility and labyrinthitis (I don't drive, that particular bus route is notoriously unreliable and my mother was out indulging in yet more hoarding/junk collecting so no help there)

Now I don't know what's going to happen. Could I lose my ESA over this if they see my failure to attend as laziness/fecklessness or will they actually get the fact that most days I'm really not good to go like I used to be? I know the Government/DWP is looking for any reason right now to save money from the benefits bill and it worries me a lot. Besides, the physiotherapist running these group sessions is a bit of a s*** to be honest...

Fibro is the worst. I've been through some crazy hard times in this life but nothing kills all hope and potential like this does and yeah, like you said, it does most unfortunately appear to be for life (whatever that is and however long it can be sustained for...)

Have a good one.
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Re: NHS Ill Health Retirement with fibro

Postby migrembe » Mon Jul 06, 2015 9:36 pm

I got ill health retirement from my job in the NHS after being off work for a year and i barely got out of bed at that point, they considered the fact of whether i would be any better in 6 months and decided on medical grounds that i wouldn't. That allowed me to leave my job and fight for ESA support group, which took a year and DLA.

However i couldn't claim my NHS pension because no Dr could say for certain that my condition wouldn't improve before my retirement age.

So, even if they let you leave on grounds of ill health, you still may not get your pension. Personally if they are saying you are going to improve then, you may, it is true, however you would never be well enough to do the same or like-job ever. So ask them, what job do they expect you to be able to do?

Beverley x
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Re: NHS Ill Health Retirement with fibro

Postby Paisleyjane » Tue Jul 07, 2015 4:21 am

Hello, I was a staff nurse working for the NHS.
I applied for and got high rate pension for fibro. One of my most pressing concerns when my fibro took hold was my fibro fog, I was concerned it would compromise my practice, so was relieved to go.
There is no way because of that would I be able to return to practice.
My colleagues thought I would be turned down initially, but it wasn't
I think the most important factor was the continuing support from occupational health team.
Good luck with things gentle hugs x
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Re: NHS Ill Health Retirement with fibro

Postby paulfoel » Tue Jul 07, 2015 9:47 am

migrembe wrote:I got ill health retirement from my job in the NHS after being off work for a year and i barely got out of bed at that point, they considered the fact of whether i would be any better in 6 months and decided on medical grounds that i wouldn't. That allowed me to leave my job and fight for ESA support group, which took a year and DLA.

However i couldn't claim my NHS pension because no Dr could say for certain that my condition wouldn't improve before my retirement age.

So, even if they let you leave on grounds of ill health, you still may not get your pension. Personally if they are saying you are going to improve then, you may, it is true, however you would never be well enough to do the same or like-job ever. So ask them, what job do they expect you to be able to do?

Beverley x


If you dont mind me asking what job did you do in the NHS? My wife is a nurse in theatre recovery - so lots of physical activity.

When you say let you leave on grounds of ill health what do you mean? Do you mean you got terminated?

Yes the pension thing. Thats the problem..... :-(
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Re: NHS Ill Health Retirement with fibro

Postby paulfoel » Tue Jul 07, 2015 9:52 am

Paisleyjane wrote:Hello, I was a staff nurse working for the NHS.
I applied for and got high rate pension for fibro. One of my most pressing concerns when my fibro took hold was my fibro fog, I was concerned it would compromise my practice, so was relieved to go.
There is no way because of that would I be able to return to practice.
My colleagues thought I would be turned down initially, but it wasn't
I think the most important factor was the continuing support from occupational health team.
Good luck with things gentle hugs x


Good to know its possible. Sounds like you had OH on side here though.....Did you get tier 2 then?

Its awful how it seems to depend on who you deal with though.
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