puppy, flat and fms

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Re: puppy, flat and fms

Postby SuperCat007 » Sun Apr 07, 2013 2:24 pm

I wouldn't still be sane without my dog, he is a rather crazy Cocker Spaniel.

I'm not going to post a huge amount because others already have. But just a few things... Of your choices a lab would probably be your most realistic bet, you can be really lucky and get a really chilled one but they will still need a lot of walking and training. They can be quite intelligent so you'll need to give him/her things to think about everyday.

I would steer clear of husky or anything like it, including cross-breeds, they can get aggressive because they NEED a lot of exercise and things to occupy their minds. So if you are both housebound with 2 children and a small-ish flat with a small garden this type of dog will not suit you. Sorry if that sounds really negative but they are getting a really bad name because people buy them because they're fluffy and cuddly and just cannot handle them. They are bred to work and therefore need to do so.

You would be better off researching breeds which are more traditionally 'pet' breeds, especially as this is your first dog. You will still need to take it dog training and give it exercise and things to do during the day. Something like a show-type cocker (try to go for black, they seem to have the calmest, cuddliest temperaments), cavaliers, yorkies etc. If you're getting a puppy then you also need to research the health tests that the parents should have before mating. Obviously these breeds that have been exploited to make nice pets have had a fair few genetic faults bred in, so ALWAYS buy from breeders who do the tests and whose dogs are clear and those who are transparent about the tests and breed faults. My dog's parents were clear but he has still ended up with a heart murmur which needs medication everyday, he was 2 when he was diagnosed. It can get costly. The same goes for rescue dogs, ensure you know the mix and any potential problems genetic, conformational or temperamental.

Wow, this turned into quite a long post. I hope it makes sense and helps you make your choice.
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Re: puppy, flat and fms

Postby buxbunny » Mon Apr 08, 2013 1:39 pm

Thanks for all great advice it's all quite insightful.

Alot of information to take in and quite rightly so as possibly life changing for next 10+ years.

I have prioritised that getting car than baby walking minimum stage want reach before the acquisition but in the meantime gives me time to read and research.

I did read up on husky seemed much harder work than a lab so i think i'm going lab pup to be honest.

Feel free to add anymore advice as i will still be looking for as much information as possible
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Re: puppy, flat and fms

Postby *Lisa* » Mon Apr 08, 2013 3:01 pm

I would advise to do lots of research on the breed before you get a pup.

Linky here may help :-)

http://www.labradorforums.co.uk/puppyguide.html

Lastly, labradors are very prone to arthritis and fat lumps. Lots of exercise and healthly diet to help this.

:goodluck1:

:dogrun1:
As a Public Moderator & Admin of this forum my opinions/views expressed are personal and are no more valid than those of other members and not necessarily those of UKFibromyalgia...Lisa
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Re: puppy, flat and fms

Postby FluppyPuffy » Mon Apr 08, 2013 3:26 pm

Bear in mind what Lisa has said about her boy and his size and power. There are a number of labs around where we are, both boys and girlies, and the differences in their sizes is :shock: :shock: :shock: :shock: :shock: Some we have known from being 8 week old runts of the litter that were expected to be dinky things, only for them to grow into bigger dogs than their littermates are now, who were almost twice their size in the early days.

We're not trying to put you off, but you nee to look at every little thing under a powerful microscope to make sure you're going down the right path, both for you and your family AND the doglet. Far too many people buy a pup then find that it is too much for them to cope with a few months down the line and have to rehome or sign it over to a rescue.

With you saying you are in communal grounds, have you spoken to the landlord/leaseholder of where you live to see if having a :dogrun1: is allowed under the terms of your contract/agreement for use of the grounds????? Some places won't allow the exercising of a :dogrun1: on their grounds.

Altho you're waiting until your youngest is :penguin: :penguin: :penguin: :penguin: :penguin: :penguin: puppies are very bouncy and wobbly little people are often sent flying by them, they can even floor adults as they become more and more hyped up. Plus the pupster will grow extremely rapidly, esp during the first year, and only stop when it reaches maturity, which, depending on the breed, may be anything between 12~24 months. Plus they go thru a teenaged~phase between 7 months~ish and 12~18 months~ish, where it seems like they have forgotten everything they have been taught/trained. Tis happens with the vast majority of breeds, regardless of size, breeding lines etc. All of which needs to be seriously taken into consideration so that the doglet has the right balance of things.
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Re: puppy, flat and fms

Postby SuperCat007 » Mon Apr 08, 2013 7:24 pm

buxbunny wrote:I did read up on husky seemed much harder work than a lab so i think i'm going lab pup to be honest.


I really don't want to be negative but I'm not convinced that a lab would be the way to go either, they can be very lively. Our next door neighbours have two and they are the most chilled out, lovely dogs I've ever known. BUT they take them out both morning and evening for over an hour for a run. They really need a lot of commitment and there are so many out there with such different breeding that it can be extremely hard to predict what you might get. Add to that they are a hugely over and in-bred breed which is rife with genetic problems. I honestly think, unless you (hopefully) become a lot more fit and healthy over the next few months, that a lab could be a lot more work than you're anticipating. Add to that they can be extremely intelligent and all the walking in the world won't calm them down, you need to give them things to occupy their brains. As an example I used to run a dog training class and I had a woman phone me asking if I could help her with her lab puppy who was 18 months old. She claimed to walk him 20 miles a day :yikes: and he was still uncontrollable and un-trainable. Really she was walking him too much and not doing enough to tire out his brain, but even so a lab is still bred to be a working dog and even though they are often pet dogs those working genes can pop up in any pup. That's why I suggested show-type Cocker (still a 'proper' dog), or a yorkie, cavalier, maybe even an Italian Greyhound, or Whippet or if you're set on getting a bigger dog then rescue greyhounds often have wonderful temperaments and HATE the cold and are often lovely cuddly characters not needing excessive exercise (though avoid letting them off the lead! :nono: ).

Like I said I really don't want to be negative or 'shoot you down' because that isn't what this forum is like and I would hate to be viewed like that. But there are so many dogs in rescue homes because people got them without doing the proper research, it would be so sad if your pup was another of that number. Have you had a look at this: http://www.thekennelclub.org.uk/buying/index.html and this: http://www.the-kennel-club.org.uk/servi ... fault.aspx they're not all very informative, but there's a lot of basic information including a search where you can put in traits you would like in a dog and the environment you will provide for the dog and it will suggest a breed for you.
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Re: puppy, flat and fms

Postby Flaw » Mon Apr 08, 2013 11:53 pm

I have to agree with supercat. I wouldn't get any medium sized, working class breed. They really do need a lot of walking and mental stimulation. My friend is in the process of having to rehome her retriever as she has become destructive and aggressive due to her not being able to give her everything she needs.

Baring in mind the children, flat and medical condition I would absolutely sing praises for a Staffordshire bull terrier. They are absolutely wonderful, they aren't called the 'nanny dog' for nothing. They are the best around children. I have an English bull terrier and despite her also adoring children she is far too boisterous to be around any tinies! Dogs like boxers, labs etc will tend to be very bouncy and easily knock children continuously as they just don't know their own strength.

I'd also second previous posters about a whippet or greyhound. So many ex racer greyhounds for rehoming and they need shorter walks in fast bursts which might suit better.

Pay no mind about 'dangerous dog' stories you see in the paper. It is all bad ownership. Lack of education will lead to bad circumstances whatever breed you go for.

I have never been without a dog since I was born and couldn't imagine life without one! They bring so much joy and love but just make sure you're absolutely ready for no sleep through the puppy stage, the toilet training and the biting with needle-like puppy teeth!

And please rescue if you can. There are plenty of dumped litters which need homes- all with just as much love to give.
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Re: puppy, flat and fms

Postby lolabolla » Tue Apr 09, 2013 1:23 am

We homed a rescue dog, we called him Jake.

We initialy decided we would home a small terrier type dog, which had to be a puppy and it just had to be a bitch.

When we went to view the rescue kennels we lost our heart to a scuffy, long haired, matted coat, big bear of a dog of the male variety.

We took him to be groomed and we couldn't believe our eyes when we went to pick him up, his coat was now silky and shiny, he looked years younger.

According to the vet after he examined his teeth he estimated that Jake was 3-4 years old and not the poor old dog that we thought no one else would rescue.

He also told us that Jake was an Irish water hound, he looked like a smaller version of Peranese mountain dog with the markings of a rottweiler, he was beautiful.

In his first days with us the cough that he had got worse. We took him back to our vets for an amergency out of hours appointment, he had kennel cough.

We were warned that he was unlikely to live till the weekend.

I stayed with him day and night for the next couple of days, wiped the green gunk that was streaming from his eyes and nose and fed him by hand as he was too weak to stand.

Jake pulled through and we shared 7 loving years with him untill he told us it was his time to go as he was in pain with cancer.

After a couple of months we decided to buy a yellow Labrador, we call her Lola.

Then 18 months later we bought Harvey a beautifull red Labrador.

He only stayed with us for 3 short years as he too had cancer.

I love my Labs to bits but in hindsite I wish I had done more research on the breed before homing one.

Labs moalt endlessly, it never ends believe me and unlike most other breeds they also have a waterproof undercoat which comes out in handfulls.

They need to be groomed several times a week, daily is better.

They need lots of exercise and plenty of space.

They allways smell ;doggy' because of the nature of their coat. You can bath them all day long and they still smell!

They eat like a horse and poop nearly as much as a horse too.

You will never be able to wear black again!

After we lost Harvey last year we decided on a friend for Lola and bought our beautifull French Bulldog, Daisy-May who also as it happens is deaf!

As someone has already mentioned, pedigree dogs can have numerous health problems and birth defects which only become apparent when the dog is fully grown.

Smaller dogs are so much easier to care for in my opinion, they eat less and the poops are smaller yay!

So please think things through, do your research and idealy home a rescue dog, they will love you forever.

Lola xx

I so miss Harvey and Jake, I think of them daily.
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Re: puppy, flat and fms

Postby LouLou » Tue Apr 09, 2013 10:15 am

Lola your post really touched me.

Our first dog was a rescue dog and it was my OH who actually rescued her. On his way to work (in a boarding Kennels and rehoming/training centre) for about a week he kept seeing this black and white border collie left tied outside a house with no food or water and it was the middle of winter. In the end he had enough and he and his boss went and spoke to the owners, who made it clear they no longer wanted the collie. So my Oh took her to work, cleaned her up and asked me if he could bring her home for the night to get her warm and fed properly.

Well she never left and we had her for 7 years until she passed away last year and we were absolutely heartbroken. We now have nother rescue a black collie cross lab (more lab than collie) and she was also mis treated by her first owners. But with a bit of love and affection she is really blossoming and it is so lovely and heartwarming to see. I do agree though about labs and their coats/poop etc lol.

I wouldn't be without Belle but if I didn't have the help of my OH I couldn't manage her on my own in terms of walking and exercise, luckily where he works OH can take her with him and she has the run of the fields all day.

It was so heartbreaking to lose a dog but thinking about it makes me so glad we gave a home to a dog who needed it and made her last 7 years very happy.

Sorry for going on lol but I hope my story shows that the love and affection you get from them is so worth it, you just have to make sure you get the right dog for you and you are right for the dog.

Most rescue centres won't re home a dog if it is anti social/violent and can't mix well with humans so if you went to one of those and told them what you wanted they could help make some suggestions.

All the best in deciding Bux.
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Re: puppy, flat and fms

Postby Flash » Tue Apr 09, 2013 11:07 am

My first dog was a border collie, rescued from 2 and a half years of abuse and different owners. She was wonderful and lived until she was 17 but the vet reckoned 18.

I then got a big Hovawart from a rescue centre, he was 5 and lived with us for 11 years. He had a lovely nature and hovawarts are reknowned for being great with kids. But as with any big dog, needed a lot of long walks.

My latest is a collie X jack russel X corgi. I got her at 10 weeks. I chose a smaller dog due to deteriorating health. I used to be out for hours on end, dog walking, but now, try as I might am unable to go for long walks. It suits me having a small dog as she goes out in the garden if I can't walk her far and playing indoors to keep her occupied is easier.

When I first got her, I thought I'd made a mistake. it was hard work but I never had anyone willing to take over when it got too much for me but I wouldn't be without her now.

While doing animal healing, I have found that labradors are my most regular clients, with the already mentioned arthritis and fat lumps and cysts. Vet bills for larger dogs are more expencive.
Greyhound rescue centres are always looking for loving homes for former racers. Much better end to their carreers than what some get. They are loving couch potatoes, love a good walk but just as happy to laze around.

Huskeys are a lifes work, they need so much stimulation, loads of space and you would need a lot of knowledge. My friend has her two run around a large field dragging tyres. They are the type that have to work and work to stay sane.

Just a few thoughts, I hope it helps.
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Re: puppy, flat and fms

Postby buxbunny » Tue Apr 09, 2013 12:40 pm

SuperCat007 wrote:
buxbunny wrote:I did read up on husky seemed much harder work than a lab so i think i'm going lab pup to be honest.


I really don't want to be negative but I'm not convinced that a lab would be the way to go either, they can be very lively. Our next door neighbours have two and they are the most chilled out, lovely dogs I've ever known. BUT they take them out both morning and evening for over an hour for a run. They really need a lot of commitment and there are so many out there with such different breeding that it can be extremely hard to predict what you might get. Add to that they are a hugely over and in-bred breed which is rife with genetic problems. I honestly think, unless you (hopefully) become a lot more fit and healthy over the next few months, that a lab could be a lot more work than you're anticipating. Add to that they can be extremely intelligent and all the walking in the world won't calm them down, you need to give them things to occupy their brains. As an example I used to run a dog training class and I had a woman phone me asking if I could help her with her lab puppy who was 18 months old. She claimed to walk him 20 miles a day :yikes: and he was still uncontrollable and un-trainable. Really she was walking him too much and not doing enough to tire out his brain, but even so a lab is still bred to be a working dog and even though they are often pet dogs those working genes can pop up in any pup. That's why I suggested show-type Cocker (still a 'proper' dog), or a yorkie, cavalier, maybe even an Italian Greyhound, or Whippet or if you're set on getting a bigger dog then rescue greyhounds often have wonderful temperaments and HATE the cold and are often lovely cuddly characters not needing excessive exercise (though avoid letting them off the lead! :nono: ).

Like I said I really don't want to be negative or 'shoot you down' because that isn't what this forum is like and I would hate to be viewed like that. But there are so many dogs in rescue homes because people got them without doing the proper research, it would be so sad if your pup was another of that number. Have you had a look at this: http://www.thekennelclub.org.uk/buying/index.html and this: http://www.the-kennel-club.org.uk/servi ... fault.aspx they're not all very informative, but there's a lot of basic information including a search where you can put in traits you would like in a dog and the environment you will provide for the dog and it will suggest a breed for you.


Thank you for the input i dont mind negative or positive as long thier constructive as they have been as it gives me alot think of and have nothing but time. Honestly i thought a lab would be my dogmate as i think if had to be a dog it would be a lab but i'm trying to my hardest keep open mind and research other dogs you've suggested but dont think it be the same.
The whole smell thing definitely put my partner off as that was one first arguments.
Once the car is sorted i will try looking at different breeders/rescue homes and spend time different dogs.
Unfortunately though i feel my partner will only really bond with dog if she gets it from pup.
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Re: puppy, flat and fms

Postby SuperCat007 » Tue Apr 09, 2013 6:50 pm

I'm really pleased you didn't interpret it as negative, I really care about animals and dogs so I think it's important that people know as much as possible. I'm pleased you're doing your research.

You say you think a lab would be your dogmate... Is that because of the companionship that labs are known for? If that is the case then they can be incredibly loving dogs, but they thrive on training and structure and if you can give that to them then you will be their one and only person. Again that is a lot of hard work, trust me I have spent 4 years training with my Cocker it is hugely rewarding but there have been many days standing outside desperately trying to do some training and keep all of it up.

Have a look at this site too: http://www.cockersonline.co.uk/discuss/ There's a lot to take in but it's a lovely community and there is so much useful information. They also have meet-ups which are great fun.

I can understand wanting to get a puppy, especially as you have fibro and two children it would mean that the pup wouldn't know any different. BUT with dogs like ex-racing greyhounds and whippets you can get a 4 month- 1 year one who will be totally un-socialised, un-house trained and be just like a puppy, but with just a little more maturity and life experience. They often live in cages when racing, so if you were to adopt one they would still be growing up not knowing anything else. I hope this makes sense.
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Re: puppy, flat and fms

Postby FluppyPuffy » Tue Apr 09, 2013 7:24 pm

buxbunny wrote:Unfortunately though i feel my partner will only really bond with dog if she gets it from pup.

There are many people who think that this is the only way they will be able to grow to love a :dogrun1: and in quite a few cases, only a specific breed. When they start looking tho, esp when deciding to rehome a waggly friend, it's amazing how many people often find that the right one for them turns out to be nothing like they had thought they would want/go for. That's why, whatever you decide to go for, it's important to make several visits before you make the finial decision. Plus the decision does need to be a family one, so it is essential that, whilst it will initially be you and your OH that do the looking and choosing, before the doglet comes home with you, your kids also get to meet him/her to be sure that you will all be suited together. You could get what seems the cutest, fluffsyist doglet ever that seems absolutely perfect, only for you to get it home and fin that it has a problem with small children.

There have been quite a variety of breeds suggested, whatever doglet that you decide on, as well as its wonderful side, there will be foibles and eccentricities as well, some of which may prove more troublesome to deal with than others.

Try to keep your mind open to all types of :dogrun1: from pedigrees/pure breeds to the good old Heinz 57 type cross breeds.
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Re: puppy, flat and fms

Postby Flash » Tue Apr 09, 2013 11:16 pm

Fluppy, I have been brought up with border collies and my own first dog was a collie too. Max the hovawart was very much like a collie, possibly crossed and I always thought I would stick to these dogs. I never wanted a JRT or anything small. Then Shay came along and changed my way of thinking totally. I'm now looking seriously into homing another small rescue dog, preferably a hienz 57. They have lovely temperments and are stronger often healthier dogs. :dogrun1:
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Re: puppy, flat and fms

Postby evie15 » Tue Apr 16, 2013 10:15 pm

I have to say a lab puppy, no matter what colour as they are all the same, will be very hard work.

Research the breed until you know it backwards and not jst because you want one.

Labs eat everything and that usually results in the destruction of furniture.
They also need a lot of exercise and walks and rolling in mud and water and then cleaning and drying.

I have a dog and when he was a puppy had a major setback as we are up a flight of stairs in a bungalow and cannot just open the door to wee, so they need to be taken down more then you think. Every hour running him dow. It wears you out.

To the person who said dont go to a breeder. The illnesses is why you DO go to a GOOD breeder who does all the genetic health tests for the breed. In labs you will look for hip scores and elbow scores.

Again a lot of research should go into this.
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