FMS.

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FMS.

Postby eddiesolo » Mon Feb 17, 2014 9:16 pm

Hi fellow sufferers.

I have introduced myself but thought I would showcase myself and symptoms.

My mother started with FMS in her 20's and she now suffers with it and RA, so was a shock to find that I seemed to showing similar signs, although she has admitted that my FMS is far worse than hers.

Symptoms for me started on and off a few years a go, general pain, stiff joints, tiredness etc. My wife thought I was lazy as it was such a bind to try and move, focus and do anything, she now understands it better. As a child I suffered from weak wrists, painful when pressure was applied like getting in a bath etc, shoulder joint pain, clicking and popping shoulders, but as a kid these things didn't seem to bother for long and you just get on with it. Early 2000's I started to feel tired and would flop on the bed and sleep after work, totally knackered. in 2007 I got Pneumonia and after that my symptoms progressed at a faster pace.

I now have:

Hand pain, feels like my hands have been smashed in a door, the bones hurt.
Wrist pain. (I wear splints when I need to.)
Forearm muscle pain.
Elbow pain.
Biceps pain, especially bottom part near elbow.
Shoulder pain, radiating from top of shoulder down arm.
Neck and back pain.
Lower rib pain.
Sternum pain.
Collar bone pain, swelling around the bones.
Hip, leg, knee and ankle pain.
And finally something new to add, right hand side jaw pain, feels like a lump at the top of my head when chewing and pain.

What makes this a right royal pain...(pardon the pun) is that the symptoms shift around, yes most are always there but it is the stabbing pains, the sharp pain in the foot or a toe, an arm muscle, around the knees, and the aching pain in the backs of my thighs. I know I have severe bouts of pain as in my hands and flare ups-my hands are killing me as I try to type this, and it is the knowing you can be okay-ish for a day or even a week then it returns with a vengeance and can last for days and weeks.

Medication is Co-Codomol when needed, Amitryptaline to help with sleep, plus I am on medication for blood pressure, Asthma, depression (two suicide attempts when younger and an exit-bag in the making past few months a go. I actually sort help this time and am seeing somebody for this.)

I have had to stop working due to this condition and am on disability, due in 2015 for the PIP do-da thingy mebob, so that is stressing me out even though it is a while off yet.

I used to be a drummer, played golf, was a play coordinator at the school I worked at and was a lollipop man for 5 years...all these are now gone. I try and carry on making models as I made these on and off for many years, but this is difficult too.

And that is my life at the moment. Not good, as I doubt many on this forum are but trying to cope and understand it.

Take care and I'll speak to you soon.

Si:)
eddiesolo
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Posts: 11
Joined: Wed Apr 18, 2012 1:03 pm

Re: FMS.

Postby Zeberdi » Tue Feb 18, 2014 7:08 pm

Yep, I do understand it. Right down to the exit kit.

I worry not for me but my daughter. To me I notice little signs - I try to put them down to her working hours and other stuff but some of it is just too close. I haven't said a word to her though. Much better if she just blindly carries on and enjoys life without worrying if she will suffer as much/more than me and limit her life because of the fear.

I am glad you sought help. There are so many people who rely just on us being here and breathing. I try to explain to people how my husbands death has changed me so much yet they don't see it. Even really ill, even when he was struggling and it was so hard to take care of him it was worth every second. When he was in a room i could check in and assess how he felt, how he was reacting and take cues from him. People treated me differently because he was there, they had more time and more respect for me. Just being able to feel his hand in mine made things so much better. Since then I have talked to other widows, many who were as a result of suicide. The torture of what they would have, should have, could have done and failed to do haunt them. The what ifs, the if only. What they and their children endure for the rest of their lives is what I suffer and then some.

I think anyone with long term pain and life restricting illness that is viewless to the eye will have to face this demon. The end of the struggle and giving up seems so much easier. Thing is we never know when we will BE the difference for someone else. When we will be there when they need us or when they need us we are the cause of the pain. When I get that low I talk to myself about how much I would endure to spare those I love and realise it is usually more than I am already suffering and I can accept the pain, stress etc as the price of being there. I also remember what I would do to have my husband in my life, what I would have accepted just to have his presense in my life.

We can only do our best, the rest just is, not that I accept it all the time - I rant I rave and I am backed into that corner just as much as anyone so I know where this post comes from.xx
Zeberdi
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Posts: 51
Joined: Sat Dec 07, 2013 1:12 pm

Re: FMS.

Postby eddiesolo » Sat Feb 22, 2014 5:31 pm

Zeberdi wrote:Yep, I do understand it. Right down to the exit kit.

I worry not for me but my daughter. To me I notice little signs - I try to put them down to her working hours and other stuff but some of it is just too close. I haven't said a word to her though. Much better if she just blindly carries on and enjoys life without worrying if she will suffer as much/more than me and limit her life because of the fear.

I am glad you sought help. There are so many people who rely just on us being here and breathing. I try to explain to people how my husbands death has changed me so much yet they don't see it. Even really ill, even when he was struggling and it was so hard to take care of him it was worth every second. When he was in a room i could check in and assess how he felt, how he was reacting and take cues from him. People treated me differently because he was there, they had more time and more respect for me. Just being able to feel his hand in mine made things so much better. Since then I have talked to other widows, many who were as a result of suicide. The torture of what they would have, should have, could have done and failed to do haunt them. The what ifs, the if only. What they and their children endure for the rest of their lives is what I suffer and then some.

I think anyone with long term pain and life restricting illness that is viewless to the eye will have to face this demon. The end of the struggle and giving up seems so much easier. Thing is we never know when we will BE the difference for someone else. When we will be there when they need us or when they need us we are the cause of the pain. When I get that low I talk to myself about how much I would endure to spare those I love and realise it is usually more than I am already suffering and I can accept the pain, stress etc as the price of being there. I also remember what I would do to have my husband in my life, what I would have accepted just to have his presense in my life.

We can only do our best, the rest just is, not that I accept it all the time - I rant I rave and I am backed into that corner just as much as anyone so I know where this post comes from.xx


Sorry to hear that your daughter may have it.

It is a very frustrating illness not helped by depression, a circle of pain, depression and pain, despite help and the pain toolkits it can be a source of despair. Even after years and a diagnosis it still is a source of bafflement to many, myself included. I have a loving family and as you say what will be will be, worrying doesn't help but we all do it at times, although I am trying better :-D

Take care.

Si:)
eddiesolo
UKFM Member
 
Posts: 11
Joined: Wed Apr 18, 2012 1:03 pm


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