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Newbie After Spending 17 Years in The Dark

PostPosted: Tue Sep 22, 2015 4:43 pm
by Les Wilson
Hello,
My name is Les, I am a 61 year old male with a master’s degree in ‘the university of life’. These days I am a happy and positive person who has relief in being formally diagnosed with Fibromyalgia. After spending 17+ years in the dark I am more than content with the diagnosis.

To get the boring medical history out the way here it is. I had a major heart attack 17 years ago followed by rapidly accelerating multi joint osteoarthritis and muscle wasting. Over the last 5 years or so I have been from consultant to consult to investigate issues with balance, fatigue, pain, IBS etc. In March this year my wife pointed out that my short term memory and attention span was beyond a joke and asked me to get it sorted. Eventually I was formally diagnosed with Fibromyalgia, what a relief! Subsequent research has shown that the trauma of the heart attack fired off the rest and sent me into the fibro fog. Now after having a good understanding of FM I can adjust my life and smile again!

The 5 most important things I have learnt so far are:
Laugh at yourself and with others
Educate your family, friends, and fellow workers without them feeling sorry for you
You will always find people with far worse health issues
Do not hide behind pain, stand in front of it so it is behind you
Don’t be afraid to ask for help or to have people repeat things (no shame here as I will not remember asking in the first place) :-D

Re: Newbie After Spending 17 Years in The Dark

PostPosted: Wed Sep 23, 2015 6:07 pm
by changeoflife
Hello Les, it's funny that's it's probably the only diagnosis that when given is received with a silent "thank god!". I too find laughter is by far my best medicine. After spending months asking why, getting upset, angry, even thinking what's the point in living like this, I've now decided I'm taking back control and have found my sense of humour again, thank god! I mentioned at pain clinic the other day that I think it would be useful to have some sort of imformative evening where family/friends etc could go along and learn about fibro. So often I find when explaining my condition, I can see the words flying over their heads, or maybe it's me not finding the right words. My husband and children are wonderful but are still intrigued at times, I would be too I'm sure!! Anyway Les, you keep up with your good sense of humour and I'm pretty sure being positive and not constantly reminding yourself of being in pain is a huge bit of self empowerment that you and I both have and I'm sure many others too :-D Best wishes, Jo. X