Anxiety

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Re: Anxiety

Postby shazq » Mon Jan 18, 2010 8:58 pm

Thats great Lorraine hope it all goes well with the councillor. :hugs:
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Re: Anxiety

Postby Raine » Tue Mar 09, 2010 11:42 am

:yikes: I think I had a anxiety attach last night,never had one before but have always been of a nervous disposition. Hubby was away with work and my eldest son (21) had a friend round, now this friend has been round numerous times before and is a nice lad.

I turned in about 9.30pm as I was feeling exhaused but couldn't get to sleep, then my heart started racing and my breathing became shallow and for some unknow reason I started to feel panickey, every sound was exagerated and I started to sweat. I lay huddled under the duvet trying to workout what was happening. This lasted for sometime before it seemed to pass and I fell asleep. Woke this morning feeling like I had been hit by a bus, ache all over and feel spaced out.

Does this sound like it was an anxiety attack I've never had one before that I can remember. :?:
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Re: Anxiety

Postby gillshutt » Tue Mar 09, 2010 11:50 am

It does sound like it could be a panic attack, I would mention it to your gp if it happens again :hugs:
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Re: Anxiety

Postby Brimstone » Wed Mar 10, 2010 2:40 am

Last week I posted some useful anxiety tips that I found on the Internet (topic ‘Relieving emotional stress’ in the ‘Living with Fibromyalgia’ forum). Should have posted it here but only found this topic today.

There is a science that some of you may have heard of called NLP (Neuro-Linguistic Programming) that could also be used for controlling anxiety. This uses the association the subconscious mind makes with the normal senses of touch, sight etc. to allow people to overcome any mental difficulty, not just anxiety. It works like the links Ladymanvers described earlier in this topic, but used in a positive way.

NLP methods have proved to be very effective. In one of the classes I attended we each had to select a problem we had. I chose a difficulty I sometimes had in falling asleep at night as my brain would just keep chugging away and I couldn’t seem to wind it down. In the class I had to sit relaxed with my eyes closed and imagine a scene when I was very relaxed and sleepy. My class partner then talked me through the scene and every time I mentioned hearing a sound or sight or feel, she would press a point on my wrist that I had designated as my anchor point. That had the effect of associating the touch of my anchor point with the feeling of relaxed sleepiness.

That night when I was starting to toss and turn with sleeplessness I decided to try out the NLP method, albeit with some scepticism. I pressed the anchor point on my wrist with the thumb of the other hand and that was the last thing I remembered that night! I used the method a couple of nights later and it worked again. I have used it with some success on occasions since then although theoretically the anchor needs to be reinforced every few days.

I’m sure this could be used to help overcome stressful situations, and maybe even help you sleep better. If anyone is interested in trying it I will be happy to expand on the methodology. You can look it up on the Internet to find out more about the science.
Last edited by Brimstone on Wed Mar 10, 2010 11:42 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Anxiety

Postby gillshutt » Wed Mar 10, 2010 9:24 am

NLP is part of CBT so if you get help from a CB therapist they may well use NLP methods.

The relaxation technique I put up in tips is taken from NLP.
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Re: Anxiety

Postby Brimstone » Thu Mar 11, 2010 2:53 am

Gill

I checked out the relaxation techniques you posted in the Tips forum and they are similar to NLP techniques, but an important part of the NLP process is to associate the very powerful primary senses of touch, sight and hearing (smell and taste are secondary senses) with particular images and associating them by means of anchor points. In my example the anchor point was a spot on my wrist which by touching invoked the associated feeling of being sleepy.

In your exercise I would suggest that while subject is getting to that relaxed, safe frame of mind, every time they think of anything to do with one of the senses e.g. hearing sounds, they or preferably a partner who talks them through it, presses their designated anchor point. This does away with the need to close eyes and imagine the situation to invoke the state, which in any case may be difficult when out and about and with an anxiety attack imminent. The anchor technique is so powerful that just touching the anchor point will bring on the associated feeling without any conscious effort.

My NLP instructor said she used her anchors all the time to deal with emotional situations – like frustration. You can have different anchor points to deal with different problem states. Advanced techniques use chained anchors which are even more powerful.
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Re: Anxiety

Postby gillshutt » Thu Mar 11, 2010 8:13 am

I know... I'm a qualified CBT therapist :D

NLP techniques don't work on eveyone and it can take a long time to get the hang of them, you need to put in a fair amount of practice on your own but it can be worth it in the end. Unfortunately it is much easier to teach face to face rather than me writting it down. If I can come up with a way of making it easier then it'll be on here first :)
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Re: Anxiety

Postby Brimstone » Fri Mar 12, 2010 1:24 am

Oops! You probably know more about it than me. I’m not an NLP adept by any means, just a dabbler who has been impressed by its effectiveness.

Last night I had a bout of sleeplessness in the middle of the night. I remembered my posting and considered invoking my NLP anchor point, but before I could do anything about it I was asleep. So is it now working just by thinking about it? Something for me to investigate….

I know what you mean about the problems with doing it in writing. One is torn between covering all the angles and trying to be brief. If too long then it becomes difficult to take in while coping with the fibro fog, pain, tinnitus and everything else. Writing courses usually suggest short paragraphing and bullet points can help make complex subjects easier to digest.

As you say though, like all such procedures it won’t work with everyone. It probably depends on the subjects approach. I like to maintain a healthy scepticism rather than a closed-minded cynicism so consequently absorb new ideas like a sponge and get any benefits to be had.

But then I don’t have to cope with the non-stop distress you all have to put up with, which must undoubtedly make everything that much more difficult!
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