Tinnitus

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Re: Tinnitus

Postby mokerfish » Fri Mar 05, 2010 12:24 pm

Yep, got tinnitus, really is s******* to be honest. Ok, in part it's definately from too much loud music, being in bands, gigs, clubs etc. However I also suspect that it's from heavy antibiotic use a few years ago. It developed from there. I read in New Scientist a definate link between antibiotic use and tinnitus / inner ear damage. Although research this fact for yourselves.

Also, some doctors recommend sound masking and hearing aids to block out noise. I've done some research on this too and it's pretty much a no-no. It over stimulates the war, even more.

From my experience I find that I can listen to bass heavy, low house kinda music, but punky treble guitar stuff really gets to my tinnitus, despite the volume - Thus I think it's more pitch than volume.

Furthermore, it's been shown that listening to music that doesn't contain your tinnitus frequency actually helps, which kinda backs up what I suspected through personal experience. Read here: http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/health/8429715.stm
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Re: Tinnitus

Postby Brimstone » Tue Mar 09, 2010 1:28 am

Mokerfish, that was a useful link. Following it up further I came across an article on a study published in the journal Neurology about a variant of tinnitus called "gaze-evoked tinnitus". Apparently in the 8 subjects examined, their sound changes pitch or volume depending on the way the patient moves his field of vision to left and right, or up and down. Brain scans showed clear "imbalances" between parts of the brain linked to the auditory and visual stimuli.

Professor Alan Lockwood, who led the study, said: "This is the first research to show that a failure of the complicated way our brain systems talk to each other contributes to the cause of tinnitus. It is not the simple problem we hoped for. It remains to be seen what other parts of the brain are involved in the cause of tinnitus."

This tends to back up my hypothesis that in some cases the sound could be caused by abnormal links to other senses. If the sounds have been linked to sight in these 8 people then why not to smell or taste or even touch in other cases? However since my original posting it has occurred to me that balance is also a form of sense. It is controlled by the inner ear, so balance signals from this organ have to be processed somewhere in the brain which then automatically adjusts the muscles that stop one from falling over. Going back to my hypothesis that the autoimmune dysfunction is causing the brain to 'garble' sensory input reaching it, then this could explain both the unchanging tone of the sound (since balance doesn't vary much) and also the balance problems experienced by some tinnitus sufferers. Hearing is mostly unaffected since that involves a different set of signals i.e. sound signals.

The question then begs itself, why do you hear the sound when you are lying in bed and no balance is involved? I can't answer this yet. I'm going to research the workings of the inner ear in more detail, but maybe balance never switches off. Maybe it continues to function even when one is lying down.

I can suggest two experiments if anyone cares to help me out here. One is to take an upside down position. Get some assistance to do a headstand in a corner or failing that try and hang your upper half off the end of a bed or sofa for a couple of minutes. The other experiment is to twirl around for a few seconds until you get that dizzy feeling. This is one of a set of exercises I sometimes do. It's called the 'Whirling Dervishes' and is done with the arms outstretched horizontally to each side, palms facing downwards and spinning in a clockwise direction left to right. Please don't try this if you have any other medical problems like heart disease or blood pressure.

The idea of both is to upset the normal balance mechanisms. I would be interested to know if either of these make any difference to the tinnitus sound.
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Re: Tinnitus

Postby gillshutt » Tue Mar 09, 2010 7:14 am

Ummmm... we have FM Brimstone, hanging upside down or twirling around ain't gonna happen :shock:
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Re: Tinnitus

Postby loubie » Tue Mar 09, 2010 9:21 am

hi :wave:
i am having bad time at the min with my ears
yes i have got tinnitus but just lately i feel like i am under water & having bad time with sinuses too
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Re: Tinnitus

Postby gillshutt » Tue Mar 09, 2010 11:51 am

I get the same thing Loubie :hugs:
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Re: Tinnitus

Postby shazq » Sat Mar 13, 2010 9:17 pm

Brimstone wrote:I can suggest two experiments if anyone cares to help me out here. One is to take an upside down position. Get some assistance to do a headstand in a corner or failing that try and hang your upper half off the end of a bed or sofa for a couple of minutes. The other experiment is to twirl around for a few seconds until you get that dizzy feeling. This is one of a set of exercises I sometimes do. It's called the 'Whirling Dervishes' and is done with the arms outstretched horizontally to each side, palms facing downwards and spinning in a clockwise direction left to right. Please don't try this if you have any other medical problems like heart disease or blood pressure.

The idea of both is to upset the normal balance mechanisms. I would be interested to know if either of these make any difference to the tinnitus sound.


:yikes: :yikes: :yikes: Have i read you right, HEADSTANDS and TWIRLING. :yikes: :yikes:
My head feels as if its upside down when its not and i dont have to twirl to make myself dizzy, that happens most times when i get up. :dunno:
I dont think you will get any fibro sufferers taking you up on the Brimstone.
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Re: Tinnitus

Postby Brimstone » Mon Mar 15, 2010 2:01 am

I’m sorry if my earlier posting seemed like I am insensitive to the fact that most of you suffer from chronic pain but believe me nothing is further from the truth. Since becoming aware of the various pain-causing syndromes I have thought about little else, and it is what drives me to all the research I am doing to try and get to the bottom of it.

I can see possibilities ahead, but any scientific investigation needs answers to questions along the way, to make sure one is on track. This is not just an idle curiosity. I feel quite strongly that tinnitus is a very significant signpost to the whole issue of pain-related syndromes. I know dizziness is a norm for many of you but we need to investigate the effect of induced dizziness on tinnitus i.e. a genuine dizziness rather than one caused by ‘sensory garbling’. If the tinnitus sound changes in tone or volume or with luck disappear altogether if only for a short time, then that would be very revealing.

A dysfunction in the vestibular system that controls balance could also account for the blurred vision and pain behind the eyes that some of you experience. I can explain that in another posting.

There are many other fact-finding exercises I have wanted to suggest but knew they would be too debilitating, even though you are all quite tough and resilient. But I had hoped that the extra effort to cause a few seconds of dizziness would be worthwhile to take us a step further down the line, considering how ghastly it must be to have sounds going non-stop inside your head year after year.

Maybe for now someone with tinnitus could try riding in a lift (elevator) a few times up and down to see if that makes a difference to the sound.

I really doubt very much if a magic bullet type drug is around the corner, so any solutions will need some effort to investigate and a great deal of thinking outside the box.
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Re: Tinnitus

Postby FluppyPuffy » Mon Mar 15, 2010 2:05 pm

Brimstone wrote:
A dysfunction in the vestibular system that controls balance could also account for the blurred vision and pain behind the eyes that some of you experience. I can explain that in another posting.



Have you ever undergone any tests for vestibular problems??? I have and they are horrendous!!!! I was whirled round and round, had to follow numerous series of lights and ended up migraine that lasted for several days, plus not being able to walk because the dizziness/balance was so bad. So for me, "the extra effort to cause a few seconds of dizziness would be worthwhile" isn't the case. :nono:
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Re: Tinnitus

Postby gillshutt » Mon Mar 15, 2010 2:12 pm

I know you say you understand but you really, really don't. In most cases it wouldn't be a few seconds dizziness it would be at least a day stuck in bed on extra pain medication... personally I'd rather have the tinnitus... at least it doesn't stop me from getting out of bed or taking the kids to school. And it doesn't cause me hours of unrelenting agony which medication cannot touch.
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Re: Tinnitus

Postby Brimstone » Wed Mar 17, 2010 12:08 am

OK point taken. Thanks for the responses which are quite revealing in themselves. It seems that out of the normal exertion causes an almighty flare-up in the symptoms, which seems quite significant. In any case I am pretty well convinced now that the answer in most cases lies in ‘brain rewiring’ causing garbling of sensory input among other things and consequent neurological dysfunction. I keep coming across snippets of information that ties this to so many of the symptoms that have been mentioned in this forum. It seems there are other researchers who support this theory also which gives me confidence that this is the right track.

Fluppypuffy, I didn’t know you suffer from tinnitus also. I assume the whirling tests you underwent had no effect on that. With your history of vertebrae problems I would not have recommended any form of whirling for you anyway, much less head stands!

So in future I’ll limit myself to just asking for more information and passing on anything useful I might come across. Now I just have to sort out some ideas on why traumas start the ball rolling in the first place and why just some people are affected. Then after that will come possible solutions to help defeat the syndrome altogether. A lot of work still ahead!
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Re: Tinnitus

Postby gillshutt » Wed Mar 17, 2010 7:13 am

Just some people are affected because there is a genetic component to FM, it is more likely that you will get FM if someone else in the family has it... however it's not a given and there needs to be some sort of traumatic trigger to set it off.
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Re: Tinnitus

Postby FluppyPuffy » Wed Mar 17, 2010 5:33 pm

Brimstone wrote:Fluppypuffy, I didn’t know you suffer from tinnitus also. I assume the whirling tests you underwent had no effect on that. With your history of vertebrae problems I would not have recommended any form of whirling for you anyway, much less head stands!


On the first page of this thread I posted that I suffered with tinnitus with the description of the sound being like the scene from Poltergeist, to which you asked if I was "‘borrowing’ a sound from the memory bank that is related to alarm".

As for the vestibular tests I underwent, they were to try and induce a meniere's attack, which didn't happen as I didn't have that problem.
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Re: Tinnitus

Postby Brimstone » Thu Mar 18, 2010 2:55 am

Fluppypuffy, I’m so sorry. Of course I remember the Poltergeist conversation but got myself in a muddle with all the pseudonyms flying about on the forum. You say you suffered from dizziness after the vestibular tests and I’ve read that a Meniere’s attack is more about vertigo which is a different kind of dizziness and also leads to a loss of hearing.

But did you perceive any difference in the tone or volume of the tinnitus sound during or after the whirling? Also, have you not managed to link the onset of your migraines and the throbbing pains in your hip and all over with anything you have eaten or drunk – like milk for example or anything else rich in Calcium?

Gill, I’m pretty well convinced there is a genetic component to FM, as you point out, and probably passed down from mothers to daughters. The fact that mostly women suffer from FM suggests that the miscreant gene usually has to be on both female X chromosomes to be activated since they need to work in tandem. With men having only one X chromosome it doesn’t get activated as easily on its own. That’s just my gut feeling for now and something I have to investigate further. (There aren’t that many men on this forum and I wonder if they also have the same pattern of trauma causing the onset of symptoms. Haven’t had time to study this aspect yet.)

I think it’s likely that other family members, especially females, almost certainly also have the gene but since additional factors are involved, like the initiating traumas, they won’t always show up.
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Re: Tinnitus

Postby gillshutt » Thu Mar 18, 2010 9:20 am

Your genetics is slightly out of wack Brimstone... if it was on an X chromosome and needed 2 to kick in then NO men would get it at all. You can't have a bit of FM either you have it or not.

One of th ereasons put forward for more women than men is that a lot of men don't get dxed with it as their body makeup/build stops the tender points from hurting too much... also men tend not to go to the gp with aches and pains, they try to suffer through it.
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